The Process

January 28, 2010

Here in Alaska the process is straightforward:

Step 1) Attend your local party convention this February or March.

Those who show up will vote to elect local party leaders, will vote on to fundamentally change the state party platform and constitution (which is call “The Party Rules” in the Alaska Republican Party) and will elect local delegates to the state convention in April.

Those who do not show up will be left to wonder on Election Day why the same Republican establishment continues to support and fund the same establishment candidates as it has in the past.

Civics is not a spectator sport! Be the Grassroots – Get involved!

You can visit the Precinct Project Calendar on the right side of this page to find the date, time, and place of your local district convention.


Fact #1 – Precincts

January 28, 2010

There are 40 districts in Alaska. Within those districts there are a total of 438 election precincts.

Every precinct has a Precinct Leader position. Larger precincts will have two positions. Regardless, it is almost certainly the case that one or both of those positions in your precinct is vacant. All together, there are approximately 600 precinct positions throughout the state. Of these, it is estimated that nearly 400 are currently vacant because the party has not been able to find (or more likely not even tried to find) someone to fill that position.

Every precinct will vote to elect new precinct leaders in either February or March 2010 (elections take place every two years).

Well, perhaps we should qualify that. Every precinct should vote to elect new precinct leaders. The fact is that in the most Republican district in the state, there were no elections two years ago simply because no one cared to hold them. You may very well find that the elections for your precinct are not even scheduled, and won’t take place unless you express an interest having them. Vacant positions means no one ran for the position two years ago. And if there were no candidates, why hold an election? I’m sure you understand, which brings us to Fact #2.


Fact #2 – Districts

January 28, 2010

In the absence of active precincts, the district has become the default hub of the local Republican Party.  The 40 districts correspond exactly with the 40 State House Districts throughout the State. It is the District that is responsible for organizing local party elections every two years in the 1-2 months leading up to the State Convention.

It is important to note however that Districts very widely in their level of activity. Some districts will be very active, while others will be struggling, and some districts do not even have a single Republican volunteer who is willing to lead the District (this usually pertains only to the most rural House Districts).


Number of State Delegates

January 28, 2010

As there is no election required to be a delegate at a District Convention, there is also no limit on the number of people who can attend and participate in a local District Convention. At your local District Convention you will vote to elect local delegates to the State Convention in April.

There will be no more than 350 delegates elected to the State Convention. The number of Delegates and Alternates that each district is permitted to elect are as follows:

District 1     –   9 Delegates and 9 Alternates
District 2     –   8 Delegates and 8 Alternates
District 3     –   5 Delegates and 5 Alternates
District 4     –   8 Delegates and 8 Alternates
District 5     –   7 Delegates and 7 Alternates
District 6     –   7 Delegates and 7 Alternates
District 7     – 11 Delegates and 11 Alternates
District 8     –   8 Delegates and 8 Alternates
District 9     –   7 Delegates and 7 Alternates
District 10   –   7 Delegates and 7 Alternates
District 11   – 13 Delegates and 13 Alternates
District 12   – 10 Delegates and 10 Alternates
District 13   – 15 Delegates and 15 Alternates
District 14   – 14 Delegates and 14 Alternates
District 15   – 14 Delegates and 14 Alternates
District 16   – 14 Delegates and 14 Alternates
District 17   – 12 Delegates and 12 Alternates
District 18   –   8 Delegates and 8 Alternates
District 19   –   7 Delegates and 7 Alternates
District 20  –   5 Delegates and 5 Alternates
District 21   –   8 Delegates and 8 Alternates
District 22   –   6 Delegates and 6 Alternates
District 23   –   5 Delegates and 5 Alternates
District 24   –   7 Delegates and 7 Alternates
District 25   –   5 Delegates and 5 Alternates
District 26   –   7 Delegates and 7 Alternates
District 27   –   9 Delegates and 9 Alternates
District 28   –  11 Delegates and 11 Alternates
District 29    –   7 Delegates and 7 Alternates
District 30   –  11 Delegates and 11 Alternates
District 31   –  12 Delegates and 12 Alternates
District 32   –  13 Delegates and 13 Alternates
District 33   –  11 Delegates and 11 Alternates
District 34   –  12 Delegates and 12 Alternates
District 35   –    9 Delegates and 9 Alternates
District 36   –    8 Delegates and 8 Alternates
District 37   –    5 Delegates and 5 Alternates
District 38   –    5 Delegates and 5 Alternates
District 39   –    5 Delegates and 5 Alternates
District 40   –    5 Delegates and 5 Alternates