The District Convention

January 28, 2010

Here in Alaska, Republican officials are elected every two years through a two-stage local convention process:

The first stage is a District level convention, followed one to two months later by a State level convention. Each district should have a district level convention, though even at the district level there are inevitably some districts that fail to organize a convention due to inactivity at the local level.*

In 2010, the district conventions will take place sometime between February 11th and March 15th. The State Convention will be a two-day convention and will take place on April 16th-17th.

At the District convention the following key events will take place:

1) The Election of all District leaders, followed by the election of all Precinct Leaders,

2) The Election of Delegates and Alternate Delegates to the State Convention (see the number of delegates your district is entitled to elect),

3) Proposing and approving recommended changes to the Alaska Republican Party Rules (Bylaws/Constitution),

4) Proposing and approving Party Resolutions and Position Statements,

5) Proposing and approving recommended changes to the (Statewide) Party Platform,

6) Proposing and approving recommended changes to the (Statewide) Mission Statement,

7) Proposing and approving recommended changes to the (Statewide) Statement of Principles.

All recommendations approved at the District Convention will then be forwarded to the State Convention for a final vote.

* The Alaska Republican Party permits individual Precincts to organize and elect precinct leaders prior to the District convention if they so choose. However, in reality this very rarely takes place due to inactivity at the local level.


Which District Do I live in?

January 28, 2010

The State of Alaska is divided into 40 Districts, one for each member in the Alaska State House of Representatives.

The area of each district is shown on the Election Districts Webpage.

You may also call the Elections Office in your region to verify the district and precinct you are registered to vote in. If you are not registered to vote and you call, they can look up your district and precinct if you give them your current address.

Your District and Precinct are important information.
Write it down so you don’t forget!

Alaska Division of Elections Regional Offices
Southeast Alaska Elections Office (Districts 1-5 and 33-36)
Toll-Free (866) 948-8683

Southcentral Alaska Elections Office (Districts 13-32)
Toll-Free (866) 958-8683

Matanuska-Susitna Elections Office (Mat-Su Valley Districts)
Phone (907) 373-8952

Central Alaska Elections Office (Districts 6-12)
Toll-Free (866) 959-8683

Northern and Western Alaska Elections Office (Districts 37-40)
Toll-Free (866) 953-8683


Election of State Delegates

January 28, 2010

At your local District Convention you will vote to elect Delegates to the State Convention in April. These will be the voting members of the party who will vote to elect Statewide Party Leaders, amend the Party Platform, amend the Party Constitution, Pass resolutions, endorse causes, and any other decisions occurring at the state party level.

Eligibility: There are very specific requirements for becoming a State Delegate. In order to become a State Delegate a person must have registered at the District Convention and then been elected at the District Convention. Registering as a participant at a District Convention may be accomplished either in person or over the phone during the registration window on the morning of the District Convention. The registration window will be 1-2 hours long and ends one hour after the convention begins.

The qualifications to become a state delegate are the same as the qualifications to participate in your local District Convention:

1) You must be able to register as a voter in Alaska, and
2) You must show up and register (or call in) on the morning of the District Convention,
Plus 3) You must fill out a very short Nominations Request Form expressing interest in becoming a State Delegate.

The requirements to register to vote in Alaska are very basic:
1) You must be a US citizen,
2) You must currently be an Alaska resident (e.g. you must have lived in Alaska for at least one day),
3) You must be at least 17 years and 9 months old.

The requirements in order to register as an attendee at a District Convention are also straight-forward:
1) You must sign in (or call in),
2) You must register to vote or show that you have already registered as a Republican voter in your district,
3) You must include your address, email address, phone number, and if you are interested in volunteering for anything,
4) You must pay your delegate registration fee (each district has its own fee depending on the costs of hosting the convention).

Note: If you plan to participate in your convention only by teleconference, you must find some way of demonstrating that you are a registered voter or have filled out a voter registration form.


Number of State Delegates

January 28, 2010

As there is no election required to be a delegate at a District Convention, there is also no limit on the number of people who can attend and participate in a local District Convention. At your local District Convention you will vote to elect local delegates to the State Convention in April.

There will be no more than 350 delegates elected to the State Convention. The number of Delegates and Alternates that each district is permitted to elect are as follows:

District 1     –   9 Delegates and 9 Alternates
District 2     –   8 Delegates and 8 Alternates
District 3     –   5 Delegates and 5 Alternates
District 4     –   8 Delegates and 8 Alternates
District 5     –   7 Delegates and 7 Alternates
District 6     –   7 Delegates and 7 Alternates
District 7     – 11 Delegates and 11 Alternates
District 8     –   8 Delegates and 8 Alternates
District 9     –   7 Delegates and 7 Alternates
District 10   –   7 Delegates and 7 Alternates
District 11   – 13 Delegates and 13 Alternates
District 12   – 10 Delegates and 10 Alternates
District 13   – 15 Delegates and 15 Alternates
District 14   – 14 Delegates and 14 Alternates
District 15   – 14 Delegates and 14 Alternates
District 16   – 14 Delegates and 14 Alternates
District 17   – 12 Delegates and 12 Alternates
District 18   –   8 Delegates and 8 Alternates
District 19   –   7 Delegates and 7 Alternates
District 20  –   5 Delegates and 5 Alternates
District 21   –   8 Delegates and 8 Alternates
District 22   –   6 Delegates and 6 Alternates
District 23   –   5 Delegates and 5 Alternates
District 24   –   7 Delegates and 7 Alternates
District 25   –   5 Delegates and 5 Alternates
District 26   –   7 Delegates and 7 Alternates
District 27   –   9 Delegates and 9 Alternates
District 28   –  11 Delegates and 11 Alternates
District 29    –   7 Delegates and 7 Alternates
District 30   –  11 Delegates and 11 Alternates
District 31   –  12 Delegates and 12 Alternates
District 32   –  13 Delegates and 13 Alternates
District 33   –  11 Delegates and 11 Alternates
District 34   –  12 Delegates and 12 Alternates
District 35   –    9 Delegates and 9 Alternates
District 36   –    8 Delegates and 8 Alternates
District 37   –    5 Delegates and 5 Alternates
District 38   –    5 Delegates and 5 Alternates
District 39   –    5 Delegates and 5 Alternates
District 40   –    5 Delegates and 5 Alternates


The State Convention

January 28, 2010

At the State convention in April the following key events will take place:

1) The Election of all Statewide Republican Party Officers,

2) Fundamental changes will be made to the Alaska Republican Party Rules (Bylaws/Constitution),

3) Changes will be made to the Party Platform,

4) Changes will be made to the Republican Mission Statement,

5) Changes will be made to the Republican Statement of Principles,

6) Resolutions and Position Statements will be voted on and approved.

Note: Every State Delegate is entitled to serve as a voting member of one of the State Convention Committees, and every Alternate State Delegate is entitled to serve as a non-voting member of one of the State Convention Committees.


The Precinct Leader: Most Powerful Office in the World!

January 27, 2010

Take a moment to learn why the Precinct Leader has been called the most powerful office in the country:

The Most Powerful Office in the World
written by Eagle Forum


Privileges and Duties

January 26, 2010

First, the basics:

Every position in the Alaska Republican Party is held by a volunteer. This includes the volunteer who gives you your ballot on Election Day all the way up to the State Chairman of the Party, who serves on the Republican National Committee and votes with other State Chairmen every two years to elect the National Chairman of the Republican Party.

Between the Election Worker and the State Chairman there are a variety of different positions. But the list of “voting members of the party” who actually make decisions that determine the direction of the party is much more simple. The four local officials that decide party policy are:

1) Your Precinct Leader,
2) The elected members of your local District Committee,
3) Your State Delegates,
4) The two elected members from your district who serve on the State Central Committee.

If you are wondering how many different elections you need to participate in in order to put good candidates into each of these positions, the answer is simple, just one election. Every one of these positions is elected at your local district convention that will be taking place sometime between Feb 11th and Mar 15th of this year. Every officeholder is elected to a two year term beginning immediately upon election. Let’s look at each position in turn.

1) Your Precinct Leader

Your Precinct Leader is the lowest-level party official in the nation. As explained elsewhere, it is so low that most people do not even know the position exists. However, your Precinct Leader is a “voting member of the party” and cannot be ignored. By volunteering to fill vacant Precinct Leader positions in Nevada over the past few months, Nevada Tea Parties were able to take control of every significant position of party leadership in the Nevada Republican Party, including electing a new Nevada State Chairman. [Read about this in the New York Times].

While the responsibilities of a Precinct Leader vary from state to state, there are some key responsibilities that are common in most every state. Here in Alaska the Precinct Leader has two key duties:

a) He automatically serves as a voting member of the District Board of Directors (known as the District Committee). In fact, the Precinct Leaders, when taken together outnumber all other members of the board combined and can determine every Party policy at the District level. Remember, there are only two levels in Alaska, the State and the District. Essentially, all non-statewide policies and decisions are made by the District Board of Directors, a majority of which is controlled by the local Precinct Leaders.

b) To illustrate the significance of the lowly Precinct Leader another way, let us return to an event that took place a couple of months ago. When a seat in the State Legislature becomes vacant due to a death or resignation (as happened recently in the State Senate), the Governor looks to the Party District Committee (and the Precinct Leaders who form the majority of that committee) to prepare a list of three candidates from which the Governor will choose a replacement [See Alaska Daily News Article].

Precinct Leaders may fly under the radar screen, and, like other party officials, they may not get paid for what they do, but they still have an important role to play in the direction of the party and of our state government.

2) Your Other Elected District Committee Members

Your Republican District Committee includes your two State legislators (if they are Republican of course) and each of the other district officers elected or appointed at your District Convention. Together, these officers serve as the Board of Directors for all District activities and exercise complete control over all party events, policies and funding of candidates at the district level. Under their leadership, the party will either be active or inactive, and conservative candidates will either receive support or not.

3) Your State Delegates

Based on the number of Republican voters in your district, you will elect somewhere between 5-15 Delegates to the State Convention. Only those who attend your District Convention (either via teleconference or in person) may be elected as State Delegates.

For the period of the convention, the state delegates are the highest Republican officials in the state. They set party policy, are able to completely rewrite the rules and bylaws of the party, and will elect each of the state party officers. In 2010 every single State Party Officer will be up for election and will be elected to a 4-year term.

4) The two elected members from your district who serve on the State Central Committee

Lastly, you have the two single most important positions elected at your District Convention: Your two members on the State Central Committee. The Central Committee serves as the Board of Governors of the State Party whenever the State Convention is not in session. And since conventions are only held once every two years they run the Party 99% of the time. Your District Chairman automatically serves as a voting member of the State Central Committee. So does your District “Bonus Vote” (if the legislator in your House District is a Republican).

And there you have it. You now know more about the Party and how it works than many of the people who actually run the party!